theniftyfifties:

Model wearing an evening gown by Christian Dior, 1950. Photo by Irving Penn.

theniftyfifties:

Model wearing an evening gown by Christian Dior, 1950. Photo by Irving Penn.

(Source: pinterest.com)

amjayes:

"One thing remained a horror for me - flying over a crest with people standing on the side of the road behind it. You are flying. You can´t steer. You can´t brake. In your mind you can already see what it might look like if you drove into them. It crossed my mind time and again, in a situation like that, there could be 30 people dead." - Walter Röhrl

(via theonlysolo)

(Source: myjetpack, via officialbutts)

(Source: griffinvandyke, via gothballs)

laneyloveee:

suprastar:

sadunkin:

afresherowtlook:

Trust.

Next level trust.

Love that show so much

This show was my life.

(Source: wenchyfloozymoo, via theonlysolo)

foxmouth:

Landscapes, 2014 | by Jifeng Zhang + Tumblr

(via thoughtlessfroth)

(Source: vhsdreamz, via coloringacanvas)

animatedtext:

requested by 0n-your-knees

Inglourious Basterds (2009) dir.Quentin Tarantino

(Source: alsk00, via ciginyrbed)

science-junkie:

Parasitic Plant Strangleweed Injects Host With Thousands Of Its Own Expressed Genes
Virginia Tech professor and Fralin Life Institute affiliate Jim Westwood has made a discovery about plant-to-plant communication: enormous amounts of genetic messages in the form of mRNA transcripts are transmitted from the parasitic plant Cuscuta (known more commonly as dodder and strangleweed) to its hosts.
Using Illumina next generation sequencing technologies to sequence the tissues of the host and an attached parasite, the team found that the number of genes that gets passed into the host depends on the identity of the host.  The tomato plant received 347 of the strangleweed’s mRNAs, whereas the Arabidopsis received an astonishing 9514 mRNAs.  When Arabidopsis plant receives this many mRNAs, the total genetic material of tissues in contact with the strangleweed is about 45% from the parasite.
Read more

science-junkie:

Parasitic Plant Strangleweed Injects Host With Thousands Of Its Own Expressed Genes

Virginia Tech professor and Fralin Life Institute affiliate Jim Westwood has made a discovery about plant-to-plant communication: enormous amounts of genetic messages in the form of mRNA transcripts are transmitted from the parasitic plant Cuscuta (known more commonly as dodder and strangleweed) to its hosts.

Using Illumina next generation sequencing technologies to sequence the tissues of the host and an attached parasite, the team found that the number of genes that gets passed into the host depends on the identity of the host.  The tomato plant received 347 of the strangleweed’s mRNAs, whereas the Arabidopsis received an astonishing 9514 mRNAs.  When Arabidopsis plant receives this many mRNAs, the total genetic material of tissues in contact with the strangleweed is about 45% from the parasite.

Read more

"In order to move on, you must understand why you felt what you did and why you no longer need to feel it."

— Mitch Albom, Five People You Meet In Heaven  (via passionkillers)

(Source: seabois, via infinitendeavors)

(Source: keptyn, via codypiee)

harmonypowerhouse:

*develops new crush* *looks up star sign compatibility instead of actually talking to them*

(Source: r-roisin, via vvaver)